Event Report: Top 10 Questions To Ask At The Microsoft TechEd/STB Analyst Summit

Published on June 6, 2010 by R "Ray" Wang

Clients Now See Microsoft As The Neutral Vendor, Hence All The Questions

Just less than 3 years ago, Microsoft was still perceived as part of the “evil” empire.  Business leaders worried about the complicated and expensive licensing and pricing structures.  IT leaders bemoaned the lock-in and proprietary and often buggy software.  But in a reversal of fortune, customers now worry about Google lock-in, fret over Oracle’s quest to dominate IT through M&A, wonder how hardware vendors will become software providers and vice versa, and remain in shock as Apple’s proprietary and closed approach over takes Microsoft’s market cap.

In conversations with 71 business and IT leaders, the perception on Microsoft has definitively shifted.  In fact, more than 74.6% (53/71) see Microsoft as the neutral and trusted supplier.  With an aging and retiring workforce that grew up on IBM and SAP, the next generation of IT leaders increasingly will exert their leadership and run to their comfort zone of Microsoft and Oracle.  (Note: Don’t expect this to last as the next generation of IT leadership comprises of millennials and digital natives who will try to move everything to open source and the cloud.)  Consequently, Microsoft’s technology offerings receive a renewed interest and reinvestment among customers, partners, and critical OEM’s.  Among this group, many are attending TechEd 2010 in New Orleans, LA.  Key questions they will be asking include:

  1. When will Azure have a viable business model for partners, OEM’s, and customers?
  2. Is Silverlight really ready for prime time or should organizations still leave one foot in the door with HTML 5 or Adobe Flash?
  3. What true social features will Microsoft deliver in Sharepoint, UC, and Office?
  4. After wasting a decade with Windows Mobile can Windows Phone 7 really beat out iPhone?
  5. What will the rise of NoSQL databases and in memory computing mean for SQL Server?
  6. Will Office Web Apps emerge as a significant challenger to Google’s App strategy?
  7. How quickly can Microsoft convince other apps vendors to adopt the STB platforms?
  8. Will Internet Explorer ever become W3C compliant?
  9. What’s Microsoft doing to win over the Web 2.0 crowd?
  10. What partner ecosystems will Microsoft have to rely on to gain leadership in the Cloud?

What’s your question?

The Bottom Line For The Buyer – Advances In Cloud Computing Force Organizations To Reevaluate Bets On Technology Platforms

Today the bulk of the market rests with IBM, JBOSS, Microsoft, and Oracle for technology platforms or middleware.  As cloud platforms emerge, expect new competitors such as VMForce to vie for market leadership against the legacy providers.  While most attendees at TechEd represent the faithful, attendees who are prospects, OEM’s, or mixed shops should take the time to ask the key questions.  A shift has occurred and organizations need to make the bet on how they will address hybrid deployment models and the different flavors of cloud computing.  Moreover, organizations need to place bets on next gen technologies.  One time honored technique – stay focused on the ratio of business impact and cost of delivering IT services.   The result – achieve improved alignment with business and IT.

Flickr Photo Stream From TechEd 2010

Source: © 2010 R Wang and Insider Associates, LLC. All rights reserved.

Your POV

Are you becoming more and more a Microsoft shop? If so, why? If not, what’s keeping you from making the transition?  What’s your cloud strategy for development?  Do you have a question you want to ask at TechEd but won’t be there?  Add your comments to the discussion or send on to rwang0 at gmail dot com or r at softwareinsider dot org and we’ll keep your anonymity.

Please let us know if you need help with your Microsoft and overall apps strategy and contract negotiations strategy.  Here’s how we can help:

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Although we work closely with many mega software vendors, we want you to trust us more.  Microsoft is currently a retainer client of Altimeter Group but  not a client of Insider Associates, LLC.  For the full disclosure policy please refer here.

Copyright © 2010 R Wang and Insider Associates, LLC. All rights reserved.

  • […] Top 10 Questions To Ask At The Microsoft TechEd/STB Analyst Summit Here's a view I'd not considered: "Just less than 3 years ago, Microsoft was still perceived as part of the “evil” empire. … But in a reversal of fortune, customers now worry about Google lock-in, fret over Oracle’s quest to dominate IT through M&A, wonder how hardware vendors will become software providers and vice versa, and remain in shock as Apple’s proprietary and closed approach over takes Microsoft’s market cap. … more than 74.6% (53/71) see Microsoft as the neutral and trusted supplier." (tags: Microsoft Google Apple Oracle) […]

  • Jean-Michel – good questions. There’s room to learn from SFDC, Google, and Intuit on this one and expand out the ecosystem. They certainly have the platform tools. The issue may be Dynamics adoption of those tools as quickly as they can. Based on some things I’m hearing, you can expect to see more adoption from other large ISV’s – Ray

  • I would add question on Enterprise apps :
    – will Microsoft expand the Dynamics portfolio or rather rely on Azure partners (eg : strategy on HR applications ).
    – What SaaS strategy on xRM and ERP : when will those apps be delivered on Azure ?

  • Xiao – very good points. As we see large shops look at adoption, scaling always becomes an issue. The good news is that we see them continue to build and add scale. Just take a look how far SQL server has come. However, many would say it’s still not good enough for the enterprise but that would be the Fortune 500. I’ll be curious and will add this to the list of questions. – Ray

  • Tom – great points on IE. It seems like they are moving towards open more and more. Let’s find out on the ground. – Ray

  • Ray – what about issues around HA and HyperV deficiencies. The stuff doesn’t scale yet for the enterprise. Is Muglia going to address this stuff?

    Xiao

  • Why doesn’t Microsoft open source IE? This would lead to more trust and facilitate the creation of a community of add-on developers.

    Also, Microsoft owns the Office brand (from a market size perspective, not only copyright). In recent years they have been steadily losing share to OpenOffice, Google Docs, etc.
    This is Microsoft’s market to lose as it did with IE.
    When will Microsoft offer a full-featured on-demand Office? (it hasn’t to-date for internal political reasons, not for technological ones).

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