Posts Tagged ‘Consumer Tech’

Quips: #CES2014 Preview – Trends In Digital Disruption For Consumers Center Around Mass Personalization At Scale

Consumer Trends Often Lead The Enterprise Space and CES Leads In Consumer Tech Trends


The Consumer Electronics Show begins Tuesday, January 7th, 2014 in Las Vegas.  Dubbed consumer tech’s largest event, Constellation expects to see a few big things for #CES14.  In fact, digital disruption is alive and well.  The five forces of consumer tech: social, mobile, cloud, big data and video converged early in the consumer space and has commoditized faster than ever.  Consumer tech often showcases what the art of the possible will be for the enterprise.  Five big categories for CES embody this digital disruption for consumers:

  1. Wearables go mainstream. The self quantification movement has gone from geek to chic fashion. Major fashion brands and pharma tech companies scramble to get the latest designs out.  Products range from smart watches, to bio monitoring devices, and to fitness tracking. Purpose built, these consumer devices will be the stars for CES this year.
  2. Internet of things drives data driven personalization at scale. The machine to machine and automation market is seeing a boost from home automation in lighting, entertainment, and security. The big push is to put sensors to create data driven products that can not only improve personalization but improve context and relevancy on devices.  The result will be smarter homes, smarter cars, smarter buildings, and lots of big data business models harnessed by the vendors.
  3. Video gets cheaper and better faster. 4K TVs go mainstream and price points drop.  Expect more and more OLED and lower price points. The Koreans have an edge here but don’t be surprised if someone else comes from out of the blue.  Integrated video with home entertainment and traditional PC’s are creating new form factors like Steambox in the living room.
  4. Maker movement expands accessibility. 3D printing and imaging improve in accessibility. The goal is to drive down price points, improve access, and drive up the ecosystem. Expect new business models to emerge that will enable more local production and mass personalization at scale.
  5. Robotics revolution. A host of consumer grade robotics enter the market.  The current wave cover hard labor automation, telematics, artifical intelligence, connected experiences, and simulated human relationships.  As cognitive computing improves, expect robotics to take advantage of these improvements to improve the overall interaction and self-learning.

The Bottom Line: Mass Personalization At Scale Is The Unwritten Theme of CES2014

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Event Report: Day 1 At Oracle Open World 2013: The Quest For Innovation #oow13

Past Oracle Open Worlds Have Disappointed Customers and Partners

Let’s be frank.  The past five years at Oracle Open World have disappointed even the faithful.   The over emphasis on hardware marketing and revisionist history on cloud adoption bored audiences.  The $1M paid advertorial keynotes had people walking out on the presenters 15 minutes into the speech.  Larry Ellison’s insistence on re-educating the crowd on his points subsumed the announcements on Fusion apps.   Even the cab drivers found the audience tired, the show even more tiring.

Oracle went from hot innovative must attend event to has been while most industry watchers, analysts, and media identified shows such as Box’s BoxWorks, Salesforce.com’s DreamForce, and Exact Target’s Connections as the innovation conferences in the enterprise.  These events such as Constellation’s Connected Enterprise, capture not only the spirit of innovation but also provide customers a vision to work towards.  Hence, most believe Open World could use much needed rejuvenation and a shot of innovation juju (see Figure 1.)

Figure 1. Oracle Open World Lights Up San Francisco From September 22nd to September 27th

“Next Slide Please”: Oracle Enters A Period Of Reinvention At #OOW13

Walking through the event on Saturday (Day 0) and today (Day 1), one will notice a slight change in the spirit of the event. While half the base is die hard Oracle Red Stack customers (i.e. those who grew up from database to middleware to apps), the good news is the other half of the Oracle customers who came in through acquisition (i.e. or some say by accident) are present in larger numbers.  These customers by acquisition sought best of breed, took more risks, and fought in some cases not to be on the Oracle Red Stack.

For Oracle to win the innovation battle, the company must win over the mind share of the Oracle customers by acquisition.  In fact, these customers represent the early adopters representing market leaders and fast followers while the core Oracle Red Stack is more cautious adopters and laggards (see Figure 2).  Market leaders and fast followers have key components required for successful building blocks of corporate IT and often have line of business leaders that push the envelope.  Oracle must tap into that spirit in order to move its base forward towards innovation.

Figure 2. Organizational DNA Determines Pace And Appetite For Disruptive Tech Adoption

Open World 2013 Attempts To Change The Tenor Of Oracle’s Outward Conversation

In the spirit of innovation, attendees can expect six distinct mega themes to emerge from this uber event catering to 60,000 physical attendees and potentially 100,000 online.

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Monday’s Musings: Four Elements for A #SharingEconomy Biz Model In #MatrixCommerce

Hard Times And Good Will Drive The Disownership Movement

From car sharing in the late 1990′s, to vacation rentals, to collaborative financing, the sharing economy has been inching it’s way into the forefront of the consumer’s minds.  Since the late 2000′s, thought leaders such as Rachel Botsman, Lisa Gansky, Anne-Sophie Novel, have been chronicling the forces, underlying trends, and players behind the movement. During the past five years, several poster children have emerged including AirBnB, DogVacay, Fon, GetAround, LendingClub, Liquid (Spin Lister), Lyft, Neighborgoods, Poshmark, Relay RidesSideCar, Task Rabbit, Zaarly, and ZipCar.

Also known as collaborative consumption, an April 2013 study by SunRunHomes, a solar leasing company, and Harris Interactive shows that more than half (52%) of a 2252 surveyed group of Americans, have rented, leased, or borrowed traditionally owned items in the last two years.   These items include cars, white good appliances, vacation homes, heavy tools, house hold tools, solar panels, books/textbooks, and children’s apparel (see Figure 1).  The survey reveals a uniform view that cuts across age groups and coastal biases.  In fact, the top reasons people rent, lease, or borrow traditionally owned items were saving money (53%) and cutting down on maintenance and/or storage (39%).

Figure 1. Disownership Is Now The New Normal



<iframe src=”http://www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/18111939″ width=”479″ height=”511″ frameborder=”0″ marginwidth=”0″ marginheight=”0″ scrolling=”no” style=”border:1px solid #CCC;border-width:1px 1px 0;margin-bottom:5px” allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen> </iframe> <div style=”margin-bottom:5px”> <strong> <a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/SunrunHomeSolar/disownership-infographic” title=”Disownership Infographic” target=”_blank”>Disownership Infographic</a> </strong> from <strong><a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/SunrunHomeSolar” target=”_blank”>Sunrun</a></strong> </div>

Source: SunRunHomes and Harris Interactive Study

Future Matrix Commerce Models Must Account For New Mega Trends Such As The Sharing Economy

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Monday’s Musings: Understand The Four Organizational Personas Of Disruptive Tech Adoption

Pace of Innovation Exceeds Ability To Consume

Rapid innovation, flexible deployment options, and easy consumption models create favorable conditions for the proliferation of disruptive technology.  In fact, convergence in the five pillars of enterprise disruption (i.e. social, mobile, cloud, big data, and unified communications), has led to new innovations and opportunities to apply disruptive technologies to new business models.  New business models abound at the intersection of cloud and big data, social and mobile, social and unified communications, and cloud and mobile.

Unfortunately, most organizations are awash with discovering, evaluating, and consuming disruptive technologies.  Despite IT budgets going down from 3 to 5% year over year, technology spending is up 18 to 20%.  Why?  Amidst constrained budgets, resources, and time limits, executives are willing to invest in disruptive technology to improve business outcomes.  Consequently, successful adoption is the key challenge in consuming this torrent of innovation.  This rapid pace of change and inability to consume innovation detract organizations from the realization of business value.

Organizations Fall Into Four Personas Of  Disruptive Technology Adoption

A common truism in the industry is “Culture trumps technology”.  As organizations apply methodologies such as Constellation’s DEEPR Framework in improving adoption, leaders must first determine which of the four personas best fits their organization’s appetite for consuming and innovating with disruptive technologies.

The personas of disruptive technology adoption assess organizational culture in two key axes (see Figure 1).  The first is how incremental or transformational an organization looks at applying disruptive technology to business models.  The second assesses how proactive or reactive an organization is in carrying out new initiatives.  Based on these dimensions, the four personas include:

  1. Market leaders. Market leaders prefer to drive transformational innovation.  They look at technologies as enablers in disrupting business models.  They see competitive differentiation in delivering outcomes to customers. Market leaders accept failure as part of the innovation process.  They fail fast and move on.
  2. Fast followers. Fast followers prefer to react to the success of market leaders and their experiments.  When they sense success, they tend to jump in.  Fast followers do not like to fail and rapidly apply lessons learned from market leaders into their road maps.  Fast followers tend to deliver scale in the markets as a counter balance to arriving later in the market.
  3. Cautious adopters. Cautious adopters proactively deliver incremental innovation.  They tend to take a more measured approach and spend more time studying how they can improve an existing success than creating a transformational change.  Cautious adopters often come from regulated industries where security and safety are paramount objectives.
  4. Laggards. Laggards tend to procrastinate on applying innovations to their business models.  They prefer not be bothered by trends and will only react when the trends have moved beyond mainstream.  They see value in waiting as prices will drop over time as success rates increase over time.  Laggards enjoy waiting.

During the interviews and discussions with the 2012 Constellation SuperNova award participants, key questions emerged in the decision process on whether to adopt or pass on a disruptive technologies.  These questions aligned well with the four personas of disruptive technology adoption.

Figure 1.  Organizations Should Understand Which Persona Of Disruptive Tech Adoption Describes Them Best

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Event Report: Dreamforce X (#DF12) Emerges As The South By Southwest (#SXSW) For The Enterprise

Dreamforce Represents The Mecca For The “Art Of The Possible” In The Enterprise

Whether Salesforce.com’s flagship conference at Moscone Center was the most attended conference (~48,000) or the most registered for event (~90,000), matters not.  When examined in context of the magnitude of what was accomplished, the impact of this 10th annual event transcends attendance numbers.  Business folks and the converted IT brethren converged on the week of  September 18th, 2012, to see what the future could be inside the enterprise.  They left with inspiration and the gospel of what was possible, as told by those before them.  The event represented the intersection of where aspiration meets innovation for the enterprise.

Key takeaways from interviews with over 100 attendees reflect the following trends:

  • Attendee sentiment signals the return of the front office.  Prior to the coining of the CRM term, front office was the term which defined marketing, service, eCommerce, and sales force automation.  The move back to integrated customer experiences reflects a renewed interest in all the front office touch points and all the support in the back office required to support the customer experience.  Attendees walked in with questions about how to integrate their legacy ERP and expose their transactional systems into the front office.
  • Customers seek knowledge and case studies on business transformation. Delegations arrived to see how they could change their business.  Most came with both business and IT to learn from the best practices of others.  Almost every customer case study session was packed and common questions revolved around, “How did you do that?”
  • Product announcements and pre-announcements bring the enterprise closer to the consumer experience. Pre-announcement of Salesforce Identity for Winter 2013 will provide users with Facebook-like single sign on and identity management services.  The availability of the Touch Platform services will provide a write once, deploy anywhere touch based mobile UI Experience.  The pre-announcement of the Force.com Canvas provides a UI layer to run any other application within the Salesforce.com environment.  The App Exchange Checkout delivers out of the box billing for developers and improves the users app store experience.  Geolocation capabilities in the pilot of database.com in the Winter 2013 release will improve mobile experiences.  Chatter communities pilot in Fall of 2012 and pre-announcement addresses the issue of multiple group management.
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Monday’s Musings: The New Engagement Platform Drives The Shift From Transactions

Convergence In The Five Forces Of Consumerization Of Technology Drives The Next Big Thing

Social has given us the tools to connect.  Mobile has given us the ability to interact any time and anywhere.  Cloud delivers access points to us with a rich array of content and information.  Big data provides us with the context and information to make decisions.  Unified communications and video transform how we share ideas.  This convergence of the five forces of consumerization drives the next shifts in technology.  The move from transaction to engagement and from engagement to experience is happening now.  The era of transactional apps rapidly makes way for the era of engagement.

If Business Value And Outcomes Are The Goal, Then We Need An Engagement Platform For The Enterprise

The arrival of engagement platforms does not signify time to throw out the transactional systems. In fact, those systems provide the foundation required for engagement.  The engagement layer exposes transactions and allow for deeper interaction and richer sources of information.  However, the transactional systems lack the ability to support engagement.

In fact, organizations around the world struggle with building the right engagement strategy for their customers and employees.  While crafting the right strategy should be designed prior to any technology selection, once completed, the technology to support the strategy does not exist out of the box from ANY solution provider.  Unfortunately, the technologies to achieve engagement remain disparate and hodge podge.   Many solution providers seek to achieve the engagement layer from different heritages:

  • Pure play social solutions morph to engagement apps.  Vendors such as Broadvision, Jive, Moxie, Lithium, Tibco, and Yammer have delivered many elements of the engagement layer.  These horizontal offerings provide an opportunity to assimilate disparate offerings across multiple processes and roles.  The challenge is finding the tools that support consistent integration at the process, meta data, and data layer.  Gamification vendors such as Badgeville, Bunchball, BigDoor, Crowdtwist, and Gigya play a key role in delivering outcomes and influencing behavior through engagement.  Platforms such as Atlasian, Box, GoodData, and Tidemark open the door to a new era of engagement apps.
  • Legacy transactional systems in transition to engagement. Major ERP and CRM vendors seek to address engagement with “social” and “mobile” features.  While many of the vendors have the components for engagement, the struggle will be to embed a sense and respond design point into both the interaction layer and process flows.  Salesforce embraces the social enterprise and uses Chatter as its entry point in creating engagement.  SAP attempts this with its CubeTree/SuccessFactors acquisition in Project Robus.  Oracle attacks this problem through a customer experience suite.  Microsoft acquired Yammer to create this layer inside Office and its Business Solutions portfolio. IBM embraces social business with a series of acquisitions and product enhancements to its IBM Connections product.  More importantly, IBM has built and acquired a portfolio of software solutions that sit on top of the legacy transactional systems, delivering high value and high impact.
  • Consumer offerings could enter the enterprise. With consumerization of IT increasing, platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Twitter provide a rich engagement platform that could be adopted in the enterprise.  Meanwhile, solutions providers such as Adobe blend consumer with enterprise as they provide the tools for engagement on the web and in mobile.  The challenge is dealing with societal norms between work and personal information.  The challenge is meeting enterprise class requirements for safety, security, and sustainability.
  • Vertically integrated prosumer platforms already deliver engagement. Google, Amazon, Apple, and Microsoft have the unique capability of delivering an end to end solution from hardware, consumer device, operating system, database, applications, and partner ecosystem.  Engagement platforms form the basis of future business models as consumer and enterprise blend into prosumers.  The challenge is meeting the disparate needs of enterprise and consumer.
  • Marketing and advertising networks provide rich profiles and targeting.  The ad networks are moving fast to shift engagement and offers.  While daily deal sites play one role, companies like Glam Networks also now deliver key components for ad targeting and optimization that compete with Google, Apple, Yahoo, and other media properties.   Marketing automation platforms such as
    Eloqua, Hubspot, InfusionSoft, Marketo, NeoLane, Pardot, and Parature already have may key components.  The challenge is engendering trust among the users or consumers to share more information in exchange for deemed value.

Figure 1. Technologies Will Evolve  From Transactions to P2P

The Engagement Platform Requires Nine Main Technology Components

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Event Report: CRM Evolution 2012 #CRME12

CRM Continues To Evolve In A World Of Engagement


The CRM industry’s major non-vendor customer focused event kicked off at the Marriott Marquis in New York from August 13th to 15th.  Conversations with prospects and practitioners at the event highlighted a few emerging trends:

  • Shift from transaction to engagement. CRM traditionally focused mostly on the management, a bit on the customer, and very little on the relationship.  Major shifts in engagement strategy reflect a move towards two way conversations, unstructured information, and influence models.
  • B2B and B2C are dead. The notion of forced fit silos to represent a customer no longer applies. The world is rapidly move to people to people models and new systems must reflect this.
  • The rise of customer experiences. Prior to the coining of the CRM term, front office was the term which defined marketing, service, eCommerce, and sales force automation.  The move back to integrated customer experiences reflects a renewed interest in all the front office touch points and all the support in the back office required to support the customer experience.
  • SaaS/Cloud Best of Breed hell is a real issue. Rapid and random deployment of best of breed solutions versus mature suites results in some basic architectural deficiencies.  These deficiencies result in inefficiencies that impact the delivery of customer experience as  process, data, and meta data integration increase in complexity and cost.

The Bottom Line: Customers must focus on delivering a single source of truth in the fundamentals

Customers making the shift to next generation customer experiences realize that the basic laws of physics must not be violated.  Regardless of where key components reside, a single source of truth must be delivered to support next generation customer experiences.  This requires a strong blue print and engagement platform that delivers:

  1. Listening and intent
  2. Interaction history
  3. Master data management (customer master)
  4. Business process management
  5. Complex event processing
  6. Security and identity management
  7. Integration

Your POV.

Are you ready for the new shift to front office? What are you doing to deliver an integrated customer experience?  Add your comments to the blog or send us a comment at R (at) SoftwareInsider (dot) org or R (at) ConstellationRG (dot) com

Please let us know if you need help with your business strategy efforts.  Here’s how we can assist:

  • Assessing social business/digital marketing readiness
  • Developing your social business/digital marketing  strategy
  • Designing a data to decisions strategy
  • Create a new vision of the future of work
  • Deliver a new customer experience and engagement strategy
  • Crafting a new matrix commerce strategy

Related Research:

Reprints

Reprints can be purchased through Constellation Research, Inc. To request official reprints in PDF format, please contact Sales .

Disclosure

Although we work closely with many mega software vendors, we want you to trust us. For the full disclosure policy, stay tuned for the full client list on the Constellation Research website.

* Not responsible for any factual errors or omissions.  However, happy to correct any errors upon email receipt.

Copyright © 2001 – 2012 R Wang and Insider Associates, LLC All rights reserved.
Contact the Sales team to purchase this report on a a la carte basis or join the Constellation Customer Experience!

Event Report: Questions Every #SAPPHIRENOW Attendee Should Be Asking SAP

SAP’s In The Midst Of Massive Transformation

Just four years ago, nervous attendees dealt with a tumultuous global market entering financial crisis.  SAP’s management team decided to raise maintenance fees to shore up its margins amidst a drought of innovation.  Customers revolted en masse.  Policies changed due to user group and global influencer pressure.  Less than 18 months later, a defiant CEO resigned and a new management team resolved to improve relationships with key customers and address the lack of product innovation.

Fast forward to 2012, SAP’s acquired its way into innovation with BI/analytics (Business Objects), mobile (Sybase), cloud and HR (SuccessFactors), and a tiny bit of Social (SuccessFactors Cube Tree) (See Figure 1.).  SAP HANA serves as the foundation for the future product line.  SAP’s experimenting with consumer apps such as Recalls+.  Innovation in R&D shifts from the star building fortresses of Walldorf to agile tech hubs in TelAviv, Palo Alto, Vancouver, Bangalore, and Shanghai.  From the outside view, SAP’s placed long term bets in innovation on its road to 1B users.  The growth in market cap from €30.9B in 2008 to €57.8B (as of 5/11/2012) reflects this perception by the financial community.  Has SAP succeeded where other software vendors have failed during massive periods of transition?

Figure 1. SAP Covers Three Out Of Five Innovation Pillars In The Consumerization of IT

Customers Have Reason To Remain Cautious Of SAP’s Ability To Execute

From a customers point of view, the verdict remains mixed.  Loyal customers have seen a series of failures from SAP over the past decade as it attempts to make the shift and claim innovation.  Most industry observers would agree that SAP’s made significant investments in innovation.  However, the results of organic innovation have mostly failed from products to services.   A review of the past decade shows four proof points:

  1. Delays in the next, next, next, no make that the next version of R/3. For those waiting for the latest version of ERP, the core product will probably show up late to mid decade.  Maintenance plans call for end of support in 2020 which means SAP plans a product between now and 2018 at the latest.  Customers seeking deeper industry functionality now turn to system integrators who build the user exits and customizations required to continue business.  Meanwhile, the market for third party SAP products has never been stronger.  A string of SaaS vendors have emerged to address the “edge applications” in incentive comp, talent management, pricing, travel and expense, collaboration, and marketing automation that SAP previously ignored.  Some of these “edge vendors” such as Salesforce.com have emerged as billion dollar companies creating new markets.  Yet, after several product chiefs and a decade of trying, SAP applications still lack common data models (e.g. there are at least 8 in use), common interfaces, and common process models.   The much hailed enhancement packages delivering “timeless” software require slightly less work than previous upgrades but still require a lot of planning, testing, time, and money.
  2. Clearly a confusing cloudy cloud strategy awaiting partly sunny skies. Business by design still has not achieved the tens of thousands of customers by 2010 when it was announced.  At best, SAP has a bit over 1000 live customers.  Customers who use the ByD product have mostly expressed positive comments and have seen the benefits of the OnDemand based approach.  The distribution of the product to the masses and incentivization of sales execution remains challenging to a country club, shake-hands, relationship sales culture.  Meanwhile, a series of well designed, and compelling products from the SAP OnDemand for Large Enterprise initiatives remain under marketed, and in some cases late to market.  Timing could not have been worse as the SuccessFactors acquisition has clouded the cloud strategy.  Customers seek cost effective, heterogeneous, integration options from their on-premises core to the cloud options.  SAP still has to deliver on an integration framework customers find cost effective and can trust.
  3. Never so easy, NetWeaver remains hard to use, rigid at best. Various attempts at an SAP middleware have finally made headway. The solutions now include an ABAP version and a Java version.  Previous versions remained hard to use, complicated to maintain, and confusing for the developer ecosystem and the system integrators.  Recent UI improvements help IT leaders convince business customers that they can ease back into SAP.  Everything does look better in an iPad, including SAP.  Sybase’s mobile platform replaces a failed and feeble attempt at NetWeaver mobile.  Many customers begrudgingly use NetWeaver and something else.   That something else – well, it’s typically 1/2 or 1/4 the cost.
  4. Great new maintenance offerings, low user acceptance due to sales not service offering. SAP’s made considerable effort to improve its maintenance offerings with new programs and offers to lower the cost of ownership.  Each offer considers the lifecycle of ownership and shows great care and craft in creation.  While most customers show initial interest, the sales process attempts to tie maintenance offers into new professional service revenue instead of reducing the overall spend with SAP.  Because customers mostly see ERP now as a legacy infrastructure, CIO’s intend to drive cost out not invest more in.  Hence, many customers consider  a move to third party maintenance options and SAP optimization solutions.

The track record remains mixed.  Customers remain cautions.

What Clients Want From ERP Seems Confusing At First

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Tuesday’s Tip: Five Cloud/SaaS Contract Negotiation Tips For 2012

Business Leaders Often Poorly Prepared For Cloud/SaaS Contract Negotiations

Business leaders often take great care in building their Cloud and SaaS strategy, only to have many of the benefits of flexibility and agility hampered by overlooking details in their cloud contracts.   In conversations with over 200 cloud customers in 2011, key reasons include:

  • A common belief that SaaS and Cloud contracts are simple
  • Lack of software contract negotiations and procurement experience
  • Failure to review previous departmental contracts now in renewal mode
  • Limited access to SaaS and Cloud contract expertise

Avoid These Common Mistakes In Cloud Contracts

While SaaS/Cloud contracts are considerably less complicated, buyers should remember that even Cloud/SaaS software contracts still require some careful planning.  Lessons learned from over 1200 software contract negotiations highlight five common mistakes made in cloud contracts.

  1. Blindly including support costs with the contract. While Cloud/SaaS contracts automatically bundle maintenance and updates into the subscriptions, customers often do not realize that they do not have to buy support.  In fact, vendors are not allowed to require customers to buy support with subscription.  Avoid going for the highest level support upon initial contract signing.  This option can always be added at a later date.
  2. Failure to negotiate flex up provisions. Most contracts begin with a small number of users in a departmental setting.  However as usage grow, most enterprises just add additional users without securing upfront discounts potentially leaving 1000′s of dollars on the table.  In contracts, remember to secure discounts for 2x, 3x, and 4x, your initial usage.
  3. Forgetting to negotiate flex down. As with securing discounts for adding usage, the true test of elasticity occurs when companies flex down usage.  Negotiate the ability to reduce usage by 10%, 20%, and 30% without incurring penalties.
  4. Paying upfront without a discount. While many Cloud/SaaS vendors prefer annual agreements and annual payment upfront, savvy Cloud/SaaS buyers prefer to pay in more frequent cycles such as monthly and quarterly.  Should a Cloud/SaaS provider seek upfront payment, negotiate a discount commensurate to your hurdle rate.
  5. Not trading refrenceability for success. Customers often jump at the ability to serve as a referenceable client without ensuring that the software has been deployed.  Agree to serve as a reference only after the software has been deployed.  One common strategy, trade referenceability for prioritization of key features into the next release.

As Cloud/SaaS contracts emerge as the norm, buyers should keep abreast of other changes.  Stay tuned for the 2012 Cloud/SaaS Customer Bill of Rights to be published Q1 2012.

Your POV.

Need help with your software contract?  Contact us throughout the vendor selection process.  We can help with a quick contract review or even the complete vendor selection.  Let us know your experiences.  Add your comments to the blog or reach me via email: R (at) ConstellationRG (dot) com or R (at) SoftwareInsider (dot) com.

How can we assist?

Buyers, do you need help with your apps strategy and vendor management strategy?  Trying to figure out how to infuse innovation into your tech strategy? Ready to put the expertise of over 1200 software contract negotiations to work?  Give us a call!

Please let us know if you need help with your next gen apps strategy efforts. Here’s how we can help:

  • Providing contract negotiations and software licensing support
  • Evaluating SaaS/Cloud options
  • Assessing apps strategies (e.g. single instance, two-tier ERP, upgrade, custom dev, packaged deployments”
  • Designing innovation into end to end processes and systems
  • Comparing SaaS/Cloud integration strategies
  • Assisting with legacy ERP migration
  • Engaging in an SCRM strategy
  • Planning upgrades and migration
  • Performing vendor selection

Related Resources And Links

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20090127 Tuesday’s Tip: Software Licensing and Pricing – Now’s The Time To Remove “Gag Rule” Clauses In Your Software Contracts

Reprints

Reprints can be purchased through Constellation Research, Inc. To request official reprints in PDF format, please contact sales (at) ConstellationRG (dot) com.

Disclosure

Although we work closely with many mega software vendors, we want you to trust us. For the full disclosure policy, stay tuned for the full client list on the Constellation Research website.

Copyright © 2012 R Wang and Insider Associates, LLC All rights reserved.

Press Release: Twenty-nine Protostars Recognized In The Constellation SuperNova Awards

First Inaugural Awards Designed to Celebrate the Explorers, Pioneers, and Unsung Heroes Who Successfully Put Technology to Work

SAN FRANCISCO, CA, September 20, 2011—Constellation Research, Inc., announces 29 Protostar winners, representing the 2011 SuperNova award semifinalists.  Chosen from a pool of more than 70 applicants, these individuals are recognized as among the few that have overcome the odds in successfully applying emerging and disruptive technologies within their organizations. SuperNova finalists will be recognized at a gala dinner on October 28, 2011 in Scottsdale, Arizona hosted by Constellation Research.

The Process of Picking Protostars

Most award programs recognize technology suppliers for advancements in the market. Few programs recognize individuals for their courage in battling the odds to effect change in their organization. The Constellation SuperNova Awards celebrate the explorers, the pioneers, and the unsung heroes who successfully put new technologies to work. Most importantly, these leaders have created disruptions in their market.

An allstar cast of judges have identified and selected applicants who embody the human spirit to innovate, overcome adversity, and successfully deliver market changing approaches. Applicants were subjected to a vigorous set of criteria that reflect real-world and pragmatic experience. The Protostar semifinalists were selected in five categories: social business, mobile enterprise, cloud computing, advanced analytics, and emerging technologies.

The ProtoStar Winners:

EMERGING TECH

• Imrana Ghani, Sales Operations Manager – ITS

• Mike O’Neill, CEO – Preferred Unlimited

 

ADVANCED ANALYTICS

• Charles (C.J.) Wehlage, VP Supply Chain Solutions – Sony Electronics

• Chris McLatcher, Director of Business Intelligence – Ultimate Software (NASDAQ: ULTI)

• Vernon Meyer, The Social Business Team for IT – AMP Pty Ltd

 

CLOUD COMPUTING

• Anthony L. Chirchirillo, CEO – Chirch Global Manufacturing

• Ben Doyle, Director of IT – Enterasys

• Christopher Johansen, Senior Marketing Communications Manager – Christiana Care Health System

• Daniel E. Retzer, Managing Director & Chief Technology Officer – XSP

• David Smoley, Senior Vice President & CIO – Flextronics

• Dennis Hodges, CIO – Inteva Producds

• Joe Drouin, SVP & CIO – Kelly Services

• Joe Palmer, CIO – Jefferson County Colorado

• Molly Hunting, Director of IT- Shape Corporation

• Phillip Tomczak, Vice President – Bordine’s

• Rick Parker, Cloud Architect, Activision (formerly IT Director, Fetch Technologies)

• Zahid Afzal, CIO, Huntington Bank

 

MOBILE ENTERPRISE

• Chris Perret, CEO – Nukona

 

SOCIAL BUSINESS

• Henry Ho, Partner – CORE4 Research

• Jeff Koski, Senior Director of IT – API Healthcare

• Joe Robens, IT Account Manager – Aristocrat

• John Quinn, VP of Engineering – Gilt

• Jonathan Brayshaw & Lee Hunt – Global Leader Digital Communications and Social Business & Digital Strategy Manager – Psion

• Liz Bullock & Amy Tennison, Dell Social Media Director & Dell Social Media & Community University – Dell Computer

• Matthew Ladin, Community Manager – Texas Instruments

• Scott Moore, Senior Manager College and University Initiatives – AICPA

• Vernon Meyer, The Social Business Team for IT – AMP Pty Ltd.

• Vincent Boon, Head of Community- giftgaff

“The judges have spoken and these are the best of the best among the 70 submissions”, noted R “Ray” Wang, Principal Analyst and CEO, Constellation Research, Inc., “The competition was fierce and the Protostars selected have what it takes to be the next stage – SuperNova.. Both judges and the general public will have a chance to vote and we look forward to recognizing the Finalists.”

REWARDS INCLUDE ACCESS TO INNOVATION, NETWORKING, AND RESEARCH

All Protostars will be awarded a 16th month membership in Constellation’s SuperNova Community for early adopters and innovators. In addition, Protostars will be invited to attend Constellation’s Connected Enterprise 2011 (#CCE2011), an invitation only innovation event in Scottsdale, Arizona from October 28th to 30th, 2011.

#CCE2011 is a three-day executive retreat will include mind expanding keynotes from visionaries and futurists, interactive best practices panels, The Constellation SuperNova Awards event, a golf outing, and an experiential spousal/partner program.

A select group of semi-finalists will be chosen to present on one of five best practice panels at the event. The panelists will receive one innovation retreat invitation and one spousal/partner experiential invitation.

SuperNovas (Finalists) in each category will win a one -year subscription to Constellation’s Research Library and complimentary tickets to the Connected Enterprise 2012 event, an estimated value of $120,000 per winner.

CONSTELLATION RESEARCH

Constellation Research (@ConstellationRG) is a research and advisory firm focused on disruptive and emerging technologies. This renowned group is a collection of prestigious analysts that bring real world experience, independence, and objectivity client solutions to span cross-role, cross-functional, and cross-industry points of view. Supporting a dizzying array of disruptive business models and technologies for middleware to software to services, the Constellation Research team advices the entire ecosystem of buyers, partners, solution providers and vendor clients. For more information about Constellation Research, please visit http://www.constellationrg.com.

***

Constellation Research, Constellation SuperNova Awards and the Constellation Research logo are trademarks of Constellation Research, Inc. All other products and services listed herein are trademarks of their respective companies.

Monday’s Musings: Balancing The Six S’s In Consumerization Of IT

A Natural Equilibrium Exists Among The 6 S’s Of Enterprise Class Consumerization of IT

The recent Harvard Business Review post titled, “Coming to Terms with the Consumerization of IT” (CoIT), identifies six factors for the basis of balancing enterprise class requirements.  Success requires a natural equilibrium between business needs and IT requirements as evidenced (see Figure 1).

Figure 1.  Organizations Must Balance The Six S’s To Achieve Enterprise Class CoIT

The Bottom Line: Five Factors Often Tip The Balance In Equilibrium

More…

Monday’s Musings: Real Time Versus Right Time And The Dawn Of Engagement Apps

Different Flavors Of Real-Time Result In Significant Implications.

Many pundits, research insight folks, bloggers, and hand wavers keep talking about the need for real time in social business, analytics, mobile, and other disruptive technologies.  Given the volume of data, bandwidth constraints, and magnitude of business processes to be supported, is the notion of real time even possible?  It’s been the holy grail of many technology suppliers to state they are delivering information or reacting in “real-time”.

While researching the issue, I rediscovered a classic post from event processing researcher Dr. Opher Etzion, from IBM Labs Haifa.  The central thesis from this 2007 classic post is that real-time is quite valuable in the context of “the damage caused when missing a deadline”.  When you look at that from a business value perspective, his approach leads to four types of real-time (see Figure 1):

  1. Soft real-time: there is a sense to react after the deadline, but the utility decreases (maybe fast) and at some point gets to zero – no use to do it at that point, but no damage.
  2. Firm real-time: The utility go immediately to zero when the deadline is missed – no use to do it after the deadline, but no damage.
  3. Hard essential: Missing the deadline – the utility function goes to a constant negative value; there is a constant penalty.
  4. Hard critical: Missing the deadline – the utility function goes immediately to “minus infinity”, means: a catastrophe will happen.

Figure 1. Four Types Of Real-Time And their Implications Of Missing A Deadline

Source: Dr. Opher Etzion

 

The Shift From Real-Time To Right-Time Prioritizes Events By Business Value

A deeper examination of the four types shows that business value can easily be quantified in the hard essential and hard critical types as these result in penalties and disasters when real-time is not achieved.  In the case of firm real-time, the lack of timely response results in a wasted and non-valiant effort.

Consequently, organizations must prioritize business processes for real-time by business value achieved and potentially lost.  Essentially, this prioritization results in the notion of right time delivery of information. Moreover, right time increases in value as a concept when gauged against reactiveness versus proaactiveness.

As we break down business processes by interactions, an emerging class of applications move beyond transactions.  In fact, these applications must quickly determine right time actions at the point of engagement that follow 4 distinct types (see Figure 2):

  1. Proactive value added anticipation: the heart of engagement applications, anticipation allows for proactive response.  Examples include offers, suggestions, actions based on context drivers.  Context drivers could include location, presence, time, proximity, relationships, previous purchase behaviour, etc..
  2. Mission critical reactions: where most “real-time” use cases tend to fit, this type addresses deadlines, commitments, and regulations.  Examples include response times, regulatory requirements, alerts, threshold triggers, and service level agreements.
  3. Nice things to do: reminders with minimal impact but provide proactive engagement.   Examples include status updates, background information suggestions, and non-critical notifications.
  4. Timeless responses: where useless information resides in an abyss.  Examples include log reports, short action items, nice to know information from activity streams.

More…